GM Crop Database

Database Product Description

MON89034 x TC1507 x MON88017 x DAS-59122-7 (MON-89Ø34-3 x DAS- Ø15Ø7-1 x MON-88Ø17-3 x DAS-59122-7)
Host Organism
Zea mays (Maize)
Trait
Resistance to coleopteran pests, particularly corn rootworm pests (Diabrotica spp.) and several lepidopteran pests of corn, including European corn borer (ECB, Ostrinia nubilalis), corn earworm (CEW, Helicoverpa zea), fall army worm (FAW, Spodoptera frugiperda), and black cutworm (BCW, Agrotis ipsilon); tolerance to glyphosate and glufosinate-ammonium containing herbicides.
Trait Introduction
Traditional plant breeding and selection
Proposed Use

Production for human consumption and livestock feed.

Product Developer
Monsanto Company and Mycogen Seeds c/o Dow AgroSciences LLC

Summary of Regulatory Approvals

Country Food Feed Environment Notes
Canada 2009 View
Colombia 2010
European Union 2013 2013
Japan 2009 2009 2009
Korea 2009 2009
Mexico 2010 2010
Philippines 2010 2010
South Africa 2011 2011
Taiwan 2009 2009
United States 2009 View

Introduction Expand

This stacked maize hybrid is a product of traditional plant breeding, and is therefore not automatically subject to regulation in all countries, unlike transgenic plants resulting from recombinant-DNA technologies. The approvals table above does not include entries from these countries. Other countries may request notification in advance of the release of a stacked hybrid, or may request information to conduct an environmental and food safety assessment, and these countries’ decisions are reflected in the approvals table.

MON89034 x TC1507 x MON88017 x DAS-59122-7 (SmartStax™) maize provides above-ground insect control for protection against corn earworm, European corn borer, southwestern corn borer, sugar cane borer, fall armyworm, western bean cutworm and black cutworm; and below-ground insect control for protection against Western, Northern and Mexican corn rootworms. In addition, this hybrid displays tolerance to glyphosate and glufosinate-ammonium containing herbicides, allowing for broad-spectrum weed and grass control.

For a full description of each parental line please refer to the individual product descriptions in the crop database for MON89034 and TC1507 and MON88017 and DAS-59122-7.

The inserted genes and their gene products have a history of safe use, and have undergone review and approval by several regulatory agencies. No interactions among the gene products or negative synergistic effects are expected in the stacked hybrid.

Summary of Introduced Genetic Elements Expand

Code Name Type Promoter, other Terminator Copies Form
cry1Fa2 cry1F delta-endotoxin IR ubiquitin (ubi) ZM (Zea mays) promoter and the first exon and intron 3' poly-adenylation signal from ORF25 (Agrobacterium tumefaciens) 1 functional; 1-2 partial; Altered coding sequence for optimal expression in plant cells.
pat phosphinothricin N-acetyltransferase HT CaMV 35S CaMV 35S 3' poly-adenylation signal 2
cry1A.105 chimeric cry1 delta-endotoxin IR CaMV 35S 5' untranslated leader from wheat chlorophyll a/b-binding protein 3' untranslated region of wheat heat shock protein 17.3 1
cry2Ab cry2Ab delta-endotoxin IR FMV-35S - promoter from Figwort Mosaic Virus Hsp70 intron from maize heat shock protein gene. A. tumefaciens nopaline synthase (nos) 3'-untranslated region 1
cry3Bb1 Cry3Bb1 delta-endotoxin IR CaMV 35S promoter with duplicated enhancer region 5' UTR from wheat chlorophyll a/b-binding protein; rice actin gene first intron 3' UTR from wheat heat shock protein (tahsp17 3') 1 functional synthetic
CP4 epsps 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase HT rice actin I promoter and intron sequences chloroplast transit peptide from A. thaliana A. tumefaciens nopaline synthase (nos) 3'-untranslated region 1 functional
cry34Ab1 Cry34Ab1 delta-endotoxin IR Zea mays ubiquitin gene promoter, intron and 5' UTR Solanum tuberosum proteinase inhibitor II (PINII) 1 functional Altered coding sequence for optimal expression in maize
cry35Ab1 Cry35Ab1 delta-endotoxin IR Triticum aestivum peroxidase gene root-preferred promoter Solanum tuberosum proteinase inhibitor II (PINII) 1 functional Altered coding sequence for optimal expression in maize

Characteristics of Zea mays (Maize) Expand

Center of Origin Reproduction Toxins Allergenicity

Mesoamerican region, now Mexico and Central America

Cross-pollination via wind-borne pollen is limited, pollen viability is about 30 minutes. Hybridization reported with teosinte species and rarely with members of the genus Tripsacum.

No endogenous toxins or significant levels of antinutritional factors.

Although some reported cases of maize allergy, protein(s) responsible have not been identified.

Donor Organism Characteristics Expand

Latin Name Gene Pathogenicity
Bacillus thuringiensis var. aizawai cry1F While target insects are susceptible to oral doses of Bt proteins, no evidence of toxic effects in laboratory mammals or birds.
Streptomyces viridochromogenes pat

S. viridochromogenes is ubiquitous in the soil. It exhibits very slight antimicrobial activity, is inhibited by streptomycin, and there have been no reports of adverse affects on humans, animals, or plants.

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki cry1Ab-Ac

While target insects are susceptible to oral doses of Bt proteins, no evidence of toxic effects in laboratory mammals or birds given up to 10 µg protein/g body weight.

Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kumamotoensis cry3Bb1 While coleopterans are susceptible to oral doses of Cry3Bb1 protein, there is no evidence of toxic effects in laboratory mammals or birds. There are no significant mammalian toxins or allergens associated with the host organism.
Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain CP4 CP4 epsps

Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a common soil bacterium that is responsible for causing crown gall disease in susceptible plants. There have been no reports of adverse effects on humans or animals.

Bacillus thuringiensis strain PS149B1 cry34Ab1 While target insects are susceptible to oral doses of Bt proteins, there is no evidence of toxic effects in laboratory mammals, in birds or in non-target arthropods.
Bacillus thuringiensis strain PS149B1 cry34Ab1 While target insects are susceptible to oral doses of Bt proteins, there is no evidence of toxic effects in laboratory mammals, in birds or in non-target arthropods.

Characteristics of the Modification Expand

Southern Blot Analysis

Southern blot analysis confirmed in the combined trait corn product MON89034 × TC1507 × MON88017 × DAS-59122-7 the presence of sequences identical to sequences derived from MON 89034 and MON 88017. Hybridization patterns for the combined trait product were identical to those of the parental lines with cry1F, cry34Ab1, cry35Ab1, and the pat gene probes indicating that the TC1507 and DAS-59122-7 insertions were unaffected by combining with MON89034 and MON88017 through conventional breeding.

Protein Expression Levels

MON89034 x TC1507 x MON88017 x DAS-59122-7 is a combined trait corn that produces lepidopteran-active and coleopteran-active Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins, as well as the 5- enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase protein from Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 (CP4 EPSPS) to confer tolerance to glyphosate herbicides and PAT to confer tolerance to glufosinate herbicides. The levels of the lepidopteran-active Cry1A.105, Cry2Ab2, Cry3Bb1 proteins and the CP4 EPSPS protein were determined in tissues from MON89034 x TC1507 x MON88017 x DAS-59122-7 plants grown at five U.S. field sites in 2006. The test also included a conventional corn as a negative control and MON89034 and MON88017 corns as positive controls. Leaf, root, and whole plant samples were collected over the growing season, as well as pollen and grain samples at the appropriate times. The samples were extracted and analyzed using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The levels of the Cry1A.105, Cry2Ab2, Cry3Bb1, and CP4 EPSPS proteins in MON89034 x TC1507 x MON88017 x DAS-59122-7 corn were comparable to those in the appropriate MON88017 or MON89034 positive control.

The levels of the coleopteran-active Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins Cry34Ab1, Cry35Ab1, and Cry1F, and the PAT protein were determined in tissues from MON89034 x TC1507 x MON88017 x DAS-59122-7 plants grown at five U.S. field sites in 2006. The test also included a conventional corn as a negative control and TC1507 and DAS-59122-7 parental event corn as positive controls. Leaf, root, and whole plant samples were collected over the growing season, as well as pollen and grain samples at the appropriate times. The samples were extracted and analyzed using ELISA. The results indicate that the levels of Cry34Ab1, Cry35Ab1, and Cry1F in MON89034 x TC1507 x MON88017 x DAS- 59122-7 were comparable to the levels produced in the appropriate TC1507 or DAS-59122-7 control corn. The level of PAT in MON89034 x TC1507 x MON88017 x DAS-59122-7 was higher in the combined trait products compared to TC1507 and DAS-59122-7, likely due to the presence of multiple copies of the pat gene in the stacks (one from each of the DAS parent lines).

Environmental Safety Considerations Expand

There were no identified significant adverse effects of the Cry1A.105, Cry2Ab2, Cry1F, Cry3Bb1, or Cry34Ab1/35Ab1 proteins on the abundance of non-target organisms in any field population, whether expressed individually or as MON89034 x TC1507 x MON88017 x DAS-59122-7 combined stacked maize hybrid. The potential for synergistic effects was evaluated and the data that were reviewed for the individual parental events can be bridged to support the authorization of MON89034 x TC1507 x MON88017 x DAS-59122-7.

It is unlikely that direct or indirect harmful effects to non-target organisms, including threatened or endangered species, would result from the insecticidal proteins Cry1A.105, Cry2Ab2, Cry1F, Cry3Bb1, or Cry34/35Ab as a result of the authorized environmental release of this stacked maize hybrid. There is no expectation that full commercial cultivation would result in a hazard to the environment.

Food and/or Feed Safety Considerations Expand

Coming soon.

Links to Further Information Expand


This record was last modified on Friday, June 3, 2016